Break the stereotype

heroesandvillainsofmbti:

existential-esfp:

isfp-cafe:

etherealisfp:

mbtilove:

e-n-tea-p:

anentpfemale:

netifesi:

quinintheclouds:

siriuslyjen:

round-of-applause-forthe-ne-doms:

netifesi:

entpstruggles:

intp-misfits:

I’m an INTP and I have deep, emotional feelings.

Reblog: What’s your type and how do you break its stereotypes?

I’m an ENTP and I don’t always argue with everyone

I’m an ENTP and I’m quite serious.

I’m an ENTP and I actually care about other people’s feelings

I’m an INFP and don’t have 3 million friends.

Also, my INTP has kinda gotten very good with others feelings and my ENTP is shy. Like really shy.

I’m an ENFP and I’m not all rainbows and unicorns; I’ve got quite the dark side. 

(Also the stereotype that we’re flighty and “random” is super misguided. We’re just as prone to having deep intellectual conversations as any INxJ, and our perceived randomness isn’t us trying to be silly or weird – our brains just don’t have a linear train of thought.)

my ISFJ friend’s sleep routine is worse than yours
my ISFP mom can’t art at all

I’m an ENTP and I’m no meme lord

I’m an ENTP and I don’t always argue, just most of the time 😉

I’m an Entp and am religious and really affectionate

I’m an ISFP. I don’t consider myself shy or antisocial, and I was called “bossy” as a child (my Te says “no, you were just always right!”).

ISFP: Not into art. Not into flower crowns. Not all that shy. Not into hipster anything. Not all that innocent.

ESFP: I have literally never been to a ‘party’ party. (Birthdays, hangouts, celebrations, and all that jazz, sure. But none of those hardcore parties) I have never gotten drunk. An awful dancer (it’s really bad). Also was a part of the process of several soon to be published academic research papers.

I’m an INFP, and I’m the Team Lead in charge of organizing the store at work, because when people don’t put things back where they belong, or where I have clearly labeled them to go, I turn into a rage monster.

I’m an ISTJ, and I don’t rigidly follow every tradition without question. I also do enjoy abstract thinking once in a while!

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Considering it’s the first day of my vacation I’m pretty effing stressed out. Like, the kind of stressed out where I feel like I’m made of glass and quivering enough that I might shatter. And I KNOW everything will be okay but I still feel slightly nauseous and gross and can’t shake this feeling that everything’s going to fall apart at any minute.

Anyway I just want to curse a lot. Even fun things are stressful right now. Why??? I can’t wait until Friday when I go on my actual vacation and get out of town for a while. I think I’m really gonna need it.

Sarah Reads: Girl Out of Water

Girl Out of Water by Laura Silverman

Anise Sawyer plans to spend every minute of summer with her friends: surfing, chowing down on fish tacos drizzled with wasabi balsamic vinegar, and throwing bonfires that blaze until dawn. But when a serious car wreck leaves her aunt, a single mother of three, with two broken legs, it forces Anise to say goodbye for the first time to Santa Cruz, the waves, her friends, and even a kindling romance, and fly with her dad to Nebraska for the entire summer. Living in Nebraska isn’t easy. Anise spends her days caring for her three younger cousins in the childhood home of her runaway mom, a wild figure who’s been flickering in and out of her life since birth, appearing for weeks at a time and then disappearing again for months, or even years, without a word.

Complicating matters is Lincoln, a one-armed, charismatic skater who pushes Anise to trade her surfboard for a skateboard. As Anise draws closer to Lincoln and takes on the full burden and joy of her cousins, she loses touch with her friends back home – leading her to one terrifying question: will she turn out just like her mom and spend her life leaving behind the ones she loves?

Date Started: July 30th, 2017

Acquired: Public Library

Why I Picked it Up: This is kind of a sad thing, but last year, the author, Laura Silverman, was viciously attacked on social media for being Jewish. This led to people leaving fake reviews on Goodreads that this book was “transphobic” and other crap like that to defame it before it could even be published. Word got out on Book Twitter that this was happening, and many of us added it to our TBRs and put in placeholder reviews to counteract the trolls. It’s genuinely been on my TBR since, and when I saw it at the library recently I knew it would be the perfect time to check it out. It’s not the genre I normally go for, but it seemed like a good summer read.

Why I Kept Reading: This book has a lot of heart. It’s clear from the narration that the author worked so hard on this and really feels this story. It has a Sarah Dessen and Catherine Gilbert Murdock vibe, and the story is a relatable contemporary summer tale. I want to see how everything will work out for Anise, and I’m rooting for her as the protagonist. It shouldn’t take me too long to read, so I’ll probably finish tomorrow!

Stay Tuned for a Review!